2 Simple, Critical, Landing Page Rules

Standard

If you run online advertising, chances are you’ve created landing pages to go with your ads. If you haven’t, you should make landing page creation your next project! Taking a usepalette-1482678_1280r to your general website, instead of a landing page directly related to the ad they’ve just clicked on, is a mistake. Why? Because the person who clicked thru has done so because something in your ad interested them. If where they land is unrelated, they are sure to bounce, and then you’ve lost them.

The function of a landing page can vary: get the sale, get the lead, get the registration for your event. No matter what action you want your reader to take, there are 2 things you must make sure to do:

The offer or key message from your ad needs to be front and center on your landing page. When a user clicks on an ad, it’s important there’s a payoff. Use what made them click in the first place to drive them further to take action when they land on your page. For instance, if you are advertising ‘Save $100’ on your ad, make sure that’s a primary message that greets the reader.

The creative approach of your ad, even if it’s just with a particular font, needs to match your landing page. Continuity between your ad and landing page is important in keeping the experience smooth for your reader.

There are of course other things you should do on your landing page, like making sure your call to action is clear and including social proof (reviews from others), but you need to test your landing pages when you make your decisions on those design elements. What works for others won’t necessarily work for you.

Two Important Lessons about the Importance of Mentors and Helping Others

Standard

In a departure from topics that are ‘all things marketing…’ Support

I’ve been thinking about the various jobs I’ve held throughout my working life and how I’ve landed where I have. I’ve enjoyed a very successful career, and it’s because I’ve had help along the way. Yes, I’ve done much on my own, but I’ve had support, advice, recommendations and had access to open positions because of others who wanted to help me.

I am acquainted with a woman who was in a very senior role at AOL. I did not know her all that well while I was there. But I would reach out to her from time to time after leaving AOL for her advice and input on various topics. She ALWAYS responded to my emails with thoughtful, helpful advice and guidance. Not too long ago we met for dinner – at her suggestion. We got to talking about AOL and how we all now know people in many companies all over the country. It’s like we have an ‘in,’ no matter where we want to go. And she told me that whenever someone from AOL reaches out to her, she always responds. Even if she doesn’t know the person, she always tries to help.

Lesson 1 is a simple lesson that’s worth learning: it’s important to help others. Helping others is not only great for them, but it makes you feel pretty good too. It’s a win-win! Helping is easy and costs you nothing.

There are some people who I always list as references when I’m interviewing. Why? Because they want to help. They know me well from working with me in the past, and they are supportive. It’s important to know who you can count on in work (and personal!) life. And it’s equally important to be someone yourself who can be counted on.

Lesson 2 is: it’s equally important to know when to move away from those who aren’t helpful. We’ve all worked with people who do not care about helping others. Unless there’s a benefit to themselves, they aren’t interested. These aren’t necessarily bad people, but they are certain to be selfish and perhaps even a little manipulative, even if they don’t realize it. Spotting those folks, accepting who they are…and keeping your distance, is important.

As Mr. Rogers used to say: “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.”